Symptoms of Anxiety Disorder

0
637

List of Symptoms

1. People with Generalized  Anxiety Disorder (GAD) :

  • Worry very much about everyday things for at least six months, even if there is little or no reason to worry about them;
  • Excessive worry about everyday things
  • Restlessness and being unable to relax
  • Being easily startled
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Sleep issues, such as trouble falling asleep or staying asleep
  • Irritability
  • Feeling that everything will turn out badly

These issues may be accompanied by a number of physical symptoms, such as:

  • Muscle tension and muscle aches
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Trembling and twitching
  • Nausea and other gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhea
  • Lightheadedness
  • Frequent need to go to the bathroom
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Profuse sweating

Children with GAD may also show other signs of the condition, such as refusing to go to school, worrying about their safety or the safety of their loved ones, and clingy behavior.

 

2. People with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Just because you have obsessive thoughts or perform compulsive behaviors does NOT mean that you have obsessive-compulsive disorder. With OCD, these thoughts and behaviors cause tremendous distress, take up a lot of time, and interfere with your daily life and relationships.

Most people with obsessive-compulsive disorder have both obsessions and compulsions, but some people experience just one or the other.

Obsessive thoughts

Common obsessive thoughts in OCD include:

  • Fear of being contaminated by germs or dirt or contaminating others
  • Fear of losing control and harming yourself or others
  • Intrusive sexually explicit or violent thoughts and images
  • Excessive focus on religious or moral ideas
  • Fear of losing or not having things you might need
  • Order and symmetry: the idea that everything must line up “just right”
  • Superstitions; excessive attention to something considered lucky or unlucky

Compulsive behaviors

Common compulsive behaviors in OCD include:

  • Excessive double-checking of things, such as locks, appliances, and switches
  • Repeatedly checking in on loved ones to make sure they’re safe
  • Counting, tapping, repeating certain words, or doing other senseless things to reduce anxiety
  • Spending a lot of time washing or cleaning
  • Ordering or arranging things “just so”
  • Praying excessively or engaging in rituals triggered by religious fear
  • Accumulating “junk” such as old newspapers or empty food containers

Obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms in children

While the onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder usually occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, younger children sometimes have symptoms that look like OCD. However, the symptoms of other disorders, such as ADHD, autism, and Tourette’s syndrome, can also look like obsessive-compulsive disorder, so a thorough medical and psychological exam is essential before any diagnosis is made.

 People with Obsessive thoughts

Almost everyone has unpleasant or unwanted thoughts at some point, such as thinking they may have forgotten to lock the door of the house, or even sudden unwelcome violent or offensive mental images.

But if you have a persistent, unpleasant thought that dominates your thinking to the extent it interrupts other thoughts, you may have an obsession.

Some common obsessions that affect people with OCD include:

  • fear of deliberately harming yourself or others – for example, fear you may attack someone else, such as your children
  • fear of harming yourself or others by mistake – for example, fear you may set the house on fire by leaving the cooker on
  • fear of contamination by disease, infection or an unpleasant substance
  • a need for symmetry or orderliness – for example, you may feel the need to ensure all the labels on the tins in your cupboard face the same way

You may have obsessive thoughts of a violent or sexual nature that you find repulsive or frightening. But they’re just thoughts and having them doesn’t mean you’ll act on them.

People with Compulsive behavior

Compulsions arise as a way of trying to reduce or prevent anxiety caused by the obsessive thought, although in reality this behavior is either excessive or not realistically connected.

For example, a person who fears contamination with germs may wash their hands repeatedly, or someone with a fear of harming their family may have the urge to repeat an action multiple times to “neutralize” the thought.

Most people with OCD realize that such compulsive behavior is irrational and makes no logical sense, but they can’t stop acting on it and feel they need to do it “just in case”.

Common types of compulsive behavior in people with OCD include:

  • cleaning and hand washing
  • checking – such as checking doors are locked or that the gas is off
  • counting
  • ordering and arranging
  • hoarding
  • asking for reassurance
  • repeating words in their head
  • thinking “neutralizing” thoughts to counter the obsessive thoughts
  • avoiding places and situations that could trigger obsessive thoughts

Not all compulsive behaviors will be obvious to other people.

3. People with Panic Disorder

The signs and symptoms of a panic attack develop abruptly and usually reach their peak within 10 minutes. Most panic attacks end within 20 to 30 minutes, and they rarely last more than an hour.

-Shortness of breath or hyperventilation

-Heart palpitations or racing heart

-Chest pain or discomfort

-Trembling or shaking

-Choking feeling

-Feeling unreal or detached from your surroundings

-Sweating

-Nausea or upset stomach

-Feeling dizzy, light-headed, or faint

-Numbness or tingling sensations

-Hot or cold flashes

-Fear of dying, losing control, or going crazy

Is it a heart attack or a panic attack?

Panic attacks often strike when you’re away from home, but they can happen anywhere and at any time. You may have one while you’re in a store shopping, walking down the street, driving in your car, or sitting on the couch at home.

Most of the symptoms of a panic attack are physical, and many times these symptoms are so severe that you may think you’re having a heart attack. In fact, many people suffering from panic attacks make repeated trips to the doctor or the emergency room in an attempt to get treatment for what they believe is a life-threatening medical problem. While it’s important to rule out possible medical causes of symptoms such as chest pain, heart palpitations, or difficulty breathing, it’s often panic that is overlooked as a potential cause—not the other way around.

Many people experience panic attacks without further episodes or complications. There is little reason to worry if you’ve had just one or two panic attacks. However, some people who’ve experienced panic attacks go on to develop panic disorder. Panic disorder is characterized by repeated panic attacks, combined with major changes in behavior or persistent anxiety over having further attacks.

You may be suffering from panic disorder if you:

  • Experience frequent, unexpected panic attacks that aren’t tied to a specific situation
  • Worry a lot about having another panic attack
  • Are behaving differently because of the panic attacks, such as avoiding places where you’ve previously panicked

While a single panic attack may only last a few minutes, the effects of the experience can leave a lasting imprint. If you have panic disorder, the recurrent panic attacks take an emotional toll. The memory of the intense fear and terror that you felt during the attacks can negatively impact your self-confidence and cause serious disruption to your everyday life. Eventually, this leads to the following panic disorder symptoms:

Anticipatory anxiety – Instead of feeling relaxed and like yourself in between panic attacks, you feel anxious and tense. This anxiety stems from a fear of having future panic attacks. This “fear of fear” is present most of the time, and can be extremely disabling.

Panic disorder with agoraphobia

Agoraphobia was traditionally thought to involve a fear of public places and open spaces. However, it is now believed that agoraphobia develops as a complication of panic attacks. If you’re agoraphobic, you’re afraid of having a panic attack in a situation where escape would be difficult or embarrassing. You may also be afraid of having a panic attack where you wouldn’t be able to get help.

Because of these fears, you start avoiding more and more situations. For example, you might begin to avoid crowded places such as shopping malls or sports arenas. You might also avoid cars, airplanes, subways, and other forms of travel. In more severe cases, you might only feel safe at home.

Although agoraphobia can develop at any point, it usually appears within a year of your first recurrent panic attacks.

Situations or activities you may avoid if you have agoraphobia:

  • Being far away from home, driving, or going anywhere without the company of a “safe” person
  • Physical exertion – because of the belief that it could trigger a panic attack
  • Going to places where escape is not easy, such as restaurants, theaters, stores, or on public transport
  • Places where it would be embarrassing to have a panic attack, such as a social gathering
  • Eating or drinking anything that could possibly provoke panic, such as alcohol, caffeine, or certain foods or medications

Causes of panic attacks and panic disorder

Although the exact causes of panic attacks and panic disorder are unclear, the tendency to have panic attacks runs in families. There also appears to be a connection with major life transitions such as graduating from college and entering the workplace, getting married, and having a baby. Severe stress, such as the death of a loved one, divorce, or job loss can also trigger a panic attack.

Panic attacks can also be caused by medical conditions and other physical causes. If you’re suffering from symptoms of panic, it’s important to see a doctor to rule out the following possibilities:

  1. Mitral valve prolapse, a minor cardiac problem that occurs when one of the heart’s valves doesn’t close correctly
  2. Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland)
  3. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  4. Stimulant use (amphetamines, cocaine, caffeine)
  5. Medication withdrawal

    4. People with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    PTSD is diagnosed after a person experiences symptoms for at least one month following a traumatic event. However symptoms may not appear until several months or even years later. The disorder is characterized by three main types of symptoms:

    • Re-experiencing the trauma through intrusive distressing recollections of the event, flashbacks, and nightmares.
    • Emotional numbness and avoidance of places, people, and activities that are reminders of the trauma.
    • Increased arousal such as difficulty sleeping and concentrating, feeling jumpy, and being easily irritated and angered.

    Diagnosis criteria that apply to adults, adolescents, and children older than six include those below. Read more details here.

    Exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violation:

    • directly experiencing the traumatic events
    • witnessing, in person, the traumatic events
    • learning that the traumatic events occurred to a close family member or close friend; cases of actual or threatened death must have been violent or accidental
    • experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details of the traumatic events (Examples are first responders collecting human remains; police officers repeatedly exposed to details of child abuse). Note: This does not apply to exposure through electronic media, television, movies, or pictures, unless exposure is work-related.

    The presence of one or more of the following:

    • spontaneous or cued recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic events (Note: In children repetitive play may occur in which themes or aspects of the traumatic events are expressed.)
    • recurrent distressing dreams in which the content or affect (i.e. feeling) of the dream is related to the events (Note: In children there may be frightening dreams without recognizable content.)
    • flashbacks or other dissociative reactions in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic events are recurring (Note: In children trauma-specific reenactment may occur in play.)
    • intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic events
    • physiological reactions to reminders of the traumatic events

    Screen yourself or a family member for PTSD.

    Persistent avoidance of distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic events or of external reminders (i.e., people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations)

    Two or more of the following:

    • inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic events (not due to head injury, alcohol, or drugs)
    • persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad,” “No one can be trusted,” “The world is completely dangerous”).
    • persistent, distorted blame of self or others about the cause or consequences of the traumatic events
    • persistent fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame
    • markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities
    • feelings of detachment or estrangement from others
    • persistent inability to experience positive emotions

    Two or more of the following marked changes in arousal and reactivity:

    Also, clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning not attributed to the direct physiological effects of medication, drugs, or alcohol or another medical condition, such as traumatic brain injury.

    People with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD)

    Feelings of shyness or discomfort in certain situations aren’t necessarily signs of social anxiety disorder, particularly in children. Comfort levels in social situations vary, depending on personality traits and life experiences. Some people are naturally reserved and others are more outgoing.

    In contrast to everyday nervousness, social anxiety disorder includes fear, anxiety and avoidance that interfere with daily routine, work, school or other activities. Social anxiety disorder typically begins in the early to mid-teens, though it can sometimes start in younger children or in adults.

    Emotional and behavioral symptoms

    Signs and symptoms of social anxiety disorder can include persistent:

    • Fear of situations in which you may be judged
    • Worrying about embarrassing or humiliating yourself
    • Intense fear of interacting or talking with strangers
    • Fear that others will notice that you look anxious
    • Fear of physical symptoms that may cause you embarrassment, such as blushing, sweating, trembling or having a shaky voice
    • Avoiding doing things or speaking to people out of fear of embarrassment
    • Avoiding situations where you might be the center of attention
    • Having anxiety in anticipation of a feared activity or event
    • Enduring a social situation with intense fear or anxiety
    • Spending time after a social situation analyzing your performance and identifying flaws in your interactions
    • Expecting the worst possible consequences from a negative experience during a social situation

    For children, anxiety about interacting with adults or peers may be shown by crying, having temper tantrums, clinging to parents or refusing to speak in social situations.

    Performance type of social anxiety disorder is when you experience intense fear and anxiety only during speaking or performing in public, but not in other types of social situations.

    Physical symptoms

    Physical signs and symptoms can sometimes accompany social anxiety disorder and may include:

    • Blushing
    • Fast heartbeat
    • Trembling
    • Sweating
    • Upset stomach or nausea
    • Trouble catching your breath
    • Dizziness or lightheadedness
    • Feeling that your mind has gone blank
    • Muscle tension

    Avoiding common social situations

    Common, everyday experiences that may be hard to endure when you have social anxiety disorder include, for example:

    • Interacting with unfamiliar people or strangers
    • Attending parties or social gatherings
    • Going to work or school
    • Starting conversations
    • Making eye contact
    • Dating
    • Entering a room in which people are already seated
    • Returning items to a store
    • Eating in front of others
    • Using a public restroom

    Social anxiety disorder symptoms can change over time. They may flare up if you’re facing a lot of stress or demands. Although avoiding situations that produce anxiety may make you feel better in the short term, your anxiety is likely to continue over the long term if you don’t get treatment.

    When to see a doctor

    See your doctor or mental health professional if you fear and avoid normal social situations because they cause embarrassment, worry or panic.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here